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Konas

Miniature Painting

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8 hours ago, RomyCat said:

Barb, your doors look awesome. Been working on some myself. I finished the doors but now have the frames to do. I'll try to post pictures when I finally finish. 

I am in the midst of painting Dungeon Funiture Saga pack. Its been fun working the wooden furniture. I am ready to soon start on the stone fountains and the thrones. I have not figured out how I will do the thrones yet. I need to study more pictures. 

I like painting stonework a lot.  It's very zen.  My bridges turned out really well.  I'll get a picture of that this weekend too.  I've found lots of layers of dry brushing with lots of different shades (over a solid base with liberal washing pooling in the cracks) works well.  Consider playing with a green wash at the end for a mossy look.  I Frankensteined together green wash, grey wash, and a drop of brown paint.  It looks great in the right light. 

Edited by Barb Bliss
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Question: I have several minis that have dangling body parts on a base.  Some of the places are near impossible to paint the base without hitting the body part and vice versa.  Are there any tricks for painting places on the mini that are really hard to get to because other stuff is in the way?

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1 hour ago, Barb Bliss said:

Question: I have several minis that have dangling body parts on a base.  Some of the places are near impossible to paint the base without hitting the body part and vice versa.  Are there any tricks for painting places on the mini that are really hard to get to because other stuff is in the way?

Sometimes, you have to prime the pieces separately, paint them, and then glue them on. It sucks but sometimes its the safest way.

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11 minutes ago, Konas said:

Sometimes, you have to prime the pieces separately, paint them, and then glue them on. It sucks but sometimes its the safest way.

Makes sense, but look at these things.  Not even sure how I would do that.

image.png.a1c76121574244bf2d0d41273cefb7ef.pngimage.png.c9d694c2ccc868939369ce9b35365eb3.png

Edited by Barb Bliss

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5 minutes ago, Barb Bliss said:

Makes sense, but look at these things.  Not even sure how I would do that.

 

Here's the unboxing youtube.  The thing is around the 6 minute mark

 

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On ‎11‎/‎3‎/‎2017 at 7:46 AM, Barb Bliss said:

Makes sense, but look at these things.  Not even sure how I would do that.

image.png.a1c76121574244bf2d0d41273cefb7ef.pngimage.png.c9d694c2ccc868939369ce9b35365eb3.png

Honestly, with them, I would say leave them off the base until you're done painting them as well. Maybe stick them to a cork with some super glue so you can pop them off after painting or get some stickytac putty to put them on. If you have an extra base lying around you can stick them to that with a few little drops of super glue and pop them off when you're done too. If you're worried about the glue not releasing and breaking legs or something, throw the finished model in the freezer for 5 or 10 minutes and it will weaken the superglue enough that it'll snap off no problem.

 

Wait, just saw they come on bases. That's odd... Anyways, might be possible if you have a saw to remove them carefully. If not, you might just have to be very very careful painting the base. Sorry, I thought they came separate because it looked like there were little gaps between the model and the base.

Edited by Blinkus Maximus
Eyes no work right.

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5 minutes ago, Blinkus Maximus said:

Honestly, with them, I would say leave them off the base until you're done painting them as well. Maybe stick them to a cork with some super glue so you can pop them off after painting or get some stickytac putty to put them on. If you have an extra base lying around you can stick them to that with a few little drops of super glue and pop them off when you're done too. If you're worried about the glue not releasing and breaking legs or something, throw the finished model in the freezer for 5 or 10 minutes and it will weaken the superglue enough that it'll snap off no problem.

 

Wait, just saw they come on bases. That's odd... Anyways, might be possible if you have a saw to remove them carefully. If not, you might just have to be very very careful painting the base. Sorry, I thought they came separate because it looked like there were little gaps between the model and the base.

Yeah, unfortunately they are all molded together.  So far, I started out painting the base.  Then I put a full coat of "dead flesh" over the entire figure.  Then I painted the eyeballs, claws, and blemishes.  Then I spread a red wash all over the thing sans the eyeballs and blemishes.  It actually is starting to look bad ass.  I've decided to be done with the "under carriage" at this point.  I'm going to concoct some purple wash and put that over the top two thirds of the body, and then thin it and do another inch down from there.  Then start picking out details to add some paint to.

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1 minute ago, Barb Bliss said:

Yeah, unfortunately they are all molded together.  So far, I started out painting the base.  Then I put a full coat of "dead flesh" over the entire figure.  Then I painted the eyeballs, claws, and blemishes.  Then I spread a red wash all over the thing sans the eyeballs and blemishes.  It actually is starting to look bad ass.  I've decided to be done with the "under carriage" at this point.  I'm going to concoct some purple wash and put that over the top two thirds of the body, and then thin it and do another inch down from there.  Then start picking out details to add some paint to.

Nice! I can't wait to see what you did with them!

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Just now, Blinkus Maximus said:

Nice! I can't wait to see what you did with them!

What do you think about the cliffbreaker cyclops?  I'd like a do over with is face.  I actually did a do over on his face, but it only helped so much.  There was so much flesh area, I never felt good about it, but it came out ok if you assume he'd be a dirty guy.

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1 minute ago, Barb Bliss said:

What do you think about the cliffbreaker cyclops?  I'd like a do over with is face.  I actually did a do over on his face, but it only helped so much.  There was so much flesh area, I never felt good about it, but it came out ok if you assume he'd be a dirty guy.

The skin looks pretty good, definitely better than I could do when I started. Skin, and especially faces, are really tough to get right. They take a lot of practice, A LOT.

The stone looks great, only thing I can recommend on that is getting a bit darker shading in the cuts and recesses to make the highlights pop out even more, like what you have on the bridges. Do the same for the metal and belts and such and it'll bring out all that detail and look really good on the tabletop. If you want, you can also put a thin, brown wash over the teeth and it'll help separate them and give them better shape as well.

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3 minutes ago, Blinkus Maximus said:

The skin looks pretty good, definitely better than I could do when I started. Skin, and especially faces, are really tough to get right. They take a lot of practice, A LOT.

The stone looks great, only thing I can recommend on that is getting a bit darker shading in the cuts and recesses to make the highlights pop out even more, like what you have on the bridges. Do the same for the metal and belts and such and it'll bring out all that detail and look really good on the tabletop. If you want, you can also put a thin, brown wash over the teeth and it'll help separate them and give them better shape as well.

The "moss wash" took a little bit of the black wash out of the cracks, but I was getting too antsy to start on an actual figure to go back and try to get the cracks darker without screwing up the rock faces.  I didn't think about doing that to the belt et. al.  I'll have to try that a little.  The problem with Massive Darkness is the minis are either really big or kind of small.  You can see the one bridge is a little darker than the other.  That was my attempt to put the black back in the cracks, but it darkened everything instead.

Edited by Barb Bliss

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1 minute ago, Barb Bliss said:

The "moss wash" took a little bit of the black wash out of the cracks, but I was getting too antsy to start on an actual figure to go back and try to get the cracks darker without screwing up the rock faces.  I didn't think about doing that to the belt et. al.  I'll have to try that a little.  The problem with Massive Darkness is the minis are either really big or kind of small.

Dang you weren't kidding, there isn't much in between little people and huge monsters. At least you'll get experience doing a little bit of everything with that set, especially with the variation in the monsters.

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Just now, Blinkus Maximus said:

Dang you weren't kidding, there isn't much in between little people and huge monsters. At least you'll get experience doing a little bit of everything with that set, especially with the variation in the monsters.

After the decor, I went with the biggest mini cause I thought it would be easiest.  Now I'm thinking I had that back assword.

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Just now, Barb Bliss said:

After the decor, I went with the biggest mini cause I thought it would be easiest.  Now I'm thinking I had that back assword.

Eh, I'd say half and half.

I personally love big monsters because they're a great place to work on doing fun effects before you try to put them on a little mini. Because they're bigger, you can try new things like tattoos, magic effects and changing skin color and it won't look as bad on a big guy if you don't get it right. If you do the same on a small model and don't get it quite right, it can look like you accidentally hit the mini with the wrong color paint rather than a cool detail. They're also more forgiving to shaky hands because there usually aren't as many small details that might accidentally get covered up by a tiny slip of the brush the wrong direction.

But, little minis can be a little more forgiving in general. It doesn't take as much time or work to get solid colors that you can't see the undercoat through, like you did when you first started the cyclops; bigger models mean bigger areas that take more paint to completely cover, and it's much more important to keep your paints thin so you don't leave brush marks. On little guys you can also take some shortcuts to get effects that you can't do on bigger models. Doing a wash on big model skin to get your shading leaves that dirty look, which is awesome if you want it, but if you prefer a cleaner look you either have to do recess shading or clean up a bit after a big wash. On a little mini that wash won't leave as much of a dirty look because there aren't big skin areas for the wash to pool on, so it won't leave marks where you don't necessarily want them to be.

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2 minutes ago, Blinkus Maximus said:

Eh, I'd say half and half.

I personally love big monsters because they're a great place to work on doing fun effects before you try to put them on a little mini. Because they're bigger, you can try new things like tattoos, magic effects and changing skin color and it won't look as bad on a big guy if you don't get it right. If you do the same on a small model and don't get it quite right, it can look like you accidentally hit the mini with the wrong color paint rather than a cool detail. They're also more forgiving to shaky hands because there usually aren't as many small details that might accidentally get covered up by a tiny slip of the brush the wrong direction.

But, little minis can be a little more forgiving in general. It doesn't take as much time or work to get solid colors that you can't see the undercoat through, like you did when you first started the cyclops; bigger models mean bigger areas that take more paint to completely cover, and it's much more important to keep your paints thin so you don't leave brush marks. On little guys you can also take some shortcuts to get effects that you can't do on bigger models. Doing a wash on big model skin to get your shading leaves that dirty look, which is awesome if you want it, but if you prefer a cleaner look you either have to do recess shading or clean up a bit after a big wash. On a little mini that wash won't leave as much of a dirty look because there aren't big skin areas for the wash to pool on, so it won't leave marks where you don't necessarily want them to be.

That's what happened to my cyclops.  Got dirty looking.  So I went with it.

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Barb, your work looks awesome. Love reading chat of those with lots of experience.

Now I will go back to painting my doors and an army of slimes (which I made myself out of Halloween decorations and a ton of hot glue).  I will have pictures later.

 

 

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I finished panting my doors for Zombicide and for Dungeon Saga: Furniture Pack (I bought two copies).  Here are some close-up. Again, I know they are not perfect, but I had a LOT of fun doing them. And they will look great when playing both Pathfinder and Gloomhaven.

stone.JPG

wood.JPG

bookshelves.JPG

doors.JPG

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Growth as a painter:

First picture:

  • Left ~ Prepainted barrel ordered from Top Shelf Gamer.
  • Middle ~ My first attempt at painting. This barrel came from Dungeonstone's website. I used a black wash then a spray-on sealer that turned it even darker, to my disappointment. All paint used was cheap acrylic from Walmart.
  • Right ~ A barrel from Dungeon Saga. This time I used a dark brown wash and paint-on sealer, using first a shiny coat then a dull coat (thanks for the tip, guys). The metal band was a Reaper paint.

Second Picture:

  • Left ~ Prepainted chest ordered from Top Shelf Gamer.
  • Right ~ A chest from Dungeon Saga. I used the same techniques above as the barrel on the right.

barrals.JPG

chests.JPG

Edited by RomyCat
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Ahh, I'm loving these posts! Especially the growth ones, @RomyCat!

@Konas bullied me into getting a surprise gift for my boyfriend. My boyfriend and I had done some 40k in the past but don't have anyone to play with anymore (and I lost some of my army.. kinda wanna sell what I have and start over with a different faction). Anyway, bought him some Arena Rex pieces at PAX Unplugged! Boyfriend was delighted. This morning he said he might need a Skirmish Box now (which I didn't even bring up first!).

You guys definitely make me want to get back into it, though.

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Inspired by the YouTuber TheDMGinfo who makes awesome dungeon props out of cheap  materials, I created by own slime army and it cost me less than $7. I originally was only going to make ten small green ones for Gloomhaven, but then I thought, "Why stop there?" I made different sizes and colors which can be used in both D&D and Pathfinder. Then I made the mistake of showing them off to my DM. Now I might have to face-off against my own creations in an epic slime battle in the Pathfinder campaign I am doing with some friends.

Parts Price

  • Skeletons-- I bought these a few days after Halloween was over. Price only ten cents. Then I chopped up the skeletons. What fun making piles of bones.
  • Base--leftover plastic salad lid that was going to be thrown away.
  • Nails/swords & buttons/shields--bits and pieces laying around in drawers for years.
  • Slime--hot glue. I used an entire pack. Cost about $4.
  • Paint--cheap acrylic paint from Walmart. Already had the paint, so didn't really add much for coast value.
  • Slimness--I used Glosscote Lacquer Brush-On to add the shininess to the surface. I already owned this so maybe I used fifty cents worth of material.

Slime Army.JPG

Slime army close-up.jpg

Slimes everywhere.JPG

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@romy, nice.  I like the thriftiness of the project given, thanks to you and that shelving campaign, I'll be broke for a while.

I finished "the thing" last night.  I changed directions about 3 times with this guy.  I started out with zombie "dead flesh" and some wash and dry brushing.  Then decided to go multi colored washes (blue on the top of red on the top third).   Nope too dark, dry brush on lavender on top to try and lighten it up.  Nope, still too dark, so I added pink splotches.  Nope, still felt too dark so I made the eyeballs pearl-ish with yellow irises and red veining.  Now it looks like I took LSD while watching "That 70's Show", and threw up on it.  But,  you know, I kind of like it in a sick dysfunctional way.  I'll post a picture on Friday, but thought you'd enjoy imagining what it will look like for a while first.  :P

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